52. THE LAW IS THE LAW…AND HUMAN RIGHTS ARE NOT YET THE LAW. »

An annual reporting on progress of each of the Human Rights conventions to show progress article-by-article would thus seem to be highly desirable. Civil society is best placed to do this. (We simply have to make sure that certain groups are receiving particular benefits due them --and that is so much easier with the law on our side...).

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51. THE NEED TO STRUGGLE IS ACTUALLY A BUILT-IN PRINCIPLE OF HUMAN RIGHTS WORK. »

We have been deeply intimidated by the magnitude of the problem in front of us. We have imprisoned ourselves within our own skepticism, resignation and cynicism about the inevitability of Human Rights violations being a fact of life. (C. Lovelace)

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50. NGOs SHOULD NOT BE HUMAN RIGHTS BLIND AND SHOULD BE JUDGED BY THEIR POLITICS. »

Given the challenges ahead, the Human Rights agenda of NGOs cannot be apolitical; the name of the game is actually being politically smart in furthering Human Rights goals.

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49. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PROJECT AND PROCESS IS OWNERSHIP. HUMAN RIGHTS CANNOT BE IMPLEMENTED AS A PROJECT. »

While denouncing, presenting alternatives, showing the way and suggesting alternatives, Human Rights activists have to be ‘comfort-busters’ and ‘disquieters’, as well as ‘callers-to-reflection-and-action’. This eventually makes them into true alter-egos of the civil society community. Their mission is to center-the-debate and articulate-the-reasons for Human Rights. It is indeed a heroic battle of ‘universal ideas against special interests’.

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48. A CASE OF LOGIC –THE HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCACY SYLLOGISM: »

Advocacy actually is a form of political activism. If 1. is true, advocacy is part of a struggle. What struggle? Ultimately, I contend, a part of the struggle for power. If 3. is true, advocacy is a dialectical exercise of the fight of opposing

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47. STEPPING INTO THE NEW AGE OF THE RIGHT TO ADEQUATE NUTRITION: SNAIL PACE PROGRESS? (part 2 of 2) »

Going back to the example of the child, in the Basic Needs approach, the malnourished child was seen as an object with needs (and needs do not necessarily imply duties or obligations, but promises). In the Rights-Based approach, the malnourished child is seen as a subject with legitimate entitlements and claims (and rights always imply and are associated with duties and oblig

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46. STEPPING INTO THE NEW AGE OF THE RIGHT TO ADEQUATE NUTRITION: SNAIL PACE PROGRESS? (part 1 of 2) »

Unfortunately, as of now, most governments fear that the recognition of this right to adequate nutrition would interfere with their current policy choices. They need to be appeased about this fear and made to understand that certain aspects of the rights approach may be subject to progressive (gradual) realization. But they also need to be made to understand that there is a minimum core of rights that all states simply have to uphold! In the case under discussion here,

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45. Hello Mr. Sayed, Hope you are doing good. As per your request, we have shared affordable pricing for Website and apps development for e-commerce pharmacy system. Please have a look and let me know your views to take this ahead. Look forward to hear from you. Best Regards Vibhanshu Gupta »

Countering the forces of Globalization is a step towards equity; it is futile to look for an accommodation to fit greater health into an inherently inequitable system. This, because some of the HSRs measures are actually Structural Adjustment measures in disguise.

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44. AN INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S RIGHTS »

Not infrequently, the violations of children’ rights are a direct result of the violation of the rights of their care-givers own HR. To begin with, a large majority of children whose rights are violated live in poor families and poor communities.

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43. THE IDEOLOGICAL NEUTRALITY OF HUMAN RIGHTS IS ITS GREATEST STRENGTH, BUT ITS PROPONENTS SHOULD NOT BE NEUTRAL IN ENGAGING TO ACHIEVE THEM. »

Because HR pertain to all people, everywhere, one danger is that the term “human rights” be used for many disparate things, if not for everything under sun. The fear is that, eventually, the term be abused so that it gets diluted to the extent that it loses all its original meaning and becomes empty rhetoric --like so many other ‘big words’ we have seen abused --from democracy to freedom to equity...

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